Developing Norms and Standards on Disinformation

0. Обзор. Нормы

Posted by Daniel Arnaudo, Information Strategy Advisor, National Democratic Institute

 

The regulatory framework for the information space has evolved over the years as a result of collaboration between civil society groups, private sector companies, government and other stakeholders. However, the norms and standards specific to dealing with disinformation or social media issues are in their infancy: either existing initiatives are being revised to address new online threats, for example, through content moderation, corporate governance, the digital agenda and cybersecurity space, or new, dedicated to combating disinformation and the related problems of social networks are still emerging. 

This section will look at how the various codes and principles in this area are evolving and how they can potentially relate to existing international best practices, as well as ways in which programs can be developed to relate to these nascent structures. Some codes work organizationally. For example, as parties, private or public sector organizations should behave to discourage the use and promotion of disinformation, computer propaganda and other harmful forms of content by promoting openness, freedom of expression, transparency and other positive principles associated with the integrity of the information space. Others work under individual codes of practice, for example for media observers, fact-checkers and researchers in space. This section will look at both organizational and individual efforts.

One way to understand this normative framework for the information space is through the form of negotiation. For example, negotiations between technology companies and other groups (such as governments, advertisers, media, and communications professionals) to agree on common norms and standards between nongovernmental organizations, the media and civil society that provide oversight and, to some extent, have the power to enforce compliance with these rules. Different stakeholders enter into different forms of agreement with the information technology and communications sectors, depending on the issue agreed, the principles involved, the oversight and safeguards involved, and ultimately the consequences of any cancellation or deviation from conditions. These standards also target different vectors of information clutter, content, sources and users. For example, regulatory content moderation standards such as The Santa Clara Principles, the Fact-checking Principles targeting both sources and content ofthe Poynter Institute's International Fact-Checking Network , or standards such as the EU Disinformation Code, which try to address all three issues: content by encouraging better moderation. sources through encouraging efforts to identify them; and users through media information literacy standards.

Others, such as parties, politicians and the public sector, can work to enforce regulations related to online transactions with varying degrees of success. Ultimately, this regulatory framework depends on agreements between the parties to enforce them, but other forms of oversight and enforcement are available to the public. In addition, integrating inclusive gender-sensitive approaches to the development of norms and standards and reflecting how to work to promote gender equality and social inclusion in general, and how to work to counter disinformation, can and should be mutually reinforcing. Many of the structures target corporate stakeholders and in particular the technology sector, such as the Santa Clara Content Moderation Guidelines. digital rights rankings and the Global Networking Initiative; and the European Union's Code of Practice on Disinformation and Hate speech, while others interact with a wider range of groups including civil society, government, media and communications sectors. Other structures try to engage with the parties themselves, to create codes of conduct on the Internet for candidates and campaigns through informal agreements or clearer codes of conduct. Finally, a regulatory framework can be used to ensure that actors working in areas related to disinformation issues contribute to the integrity of information, such as journalists and fact-checkers. and European Union Code of Practice on Disinformation and Hate speech, while others interact with a wider range of groups, including representatives of civil society, government, the media and the communications sectors. Other structures try to engage with the parties themselves, to create codes of conduct on the Internet for candidates and campaigns through informal agreements or clearer codes of conduct. Finally, a regulatory framework can be used to ensure that actors working in areas related to disinformation issues contribute to the integrity of information, such as journalists and fact-checkers. and European Union Code of Practice on Disinformation and Hate speech, while others interact with a wider range of groups, including representatives of civil society, government, the media and the communications sectors. Other structures try to engage with the parties themselves, to create codes of conduct on the Internet for candidates and campaigns through informal agreements or clearer codes of conduct. Finally, a regulatory framework can be used to ensure that actors working in areas related to disinformation issues contribute to the integrity of information, such as journalists and fact-checkers. Media and communication sectors. Other structures try to engage with the parties themselves, to create codes of conduct on the Internet for candidates and campaigns through informal agreements or clearer codes of conduct. Finally, a regulatory framework can be used to ensure that actors working in areas related to disinformation issues contribute to the integrity of information, such as journalists and fact-checkers. Media and communication sectors. Other structures try to engage with the parties themselves, to create codes of conduct on the Internet for candidates and campaigns through informal agreements or clearer codes of conduct. Finally, a regulatory framework can be used to ensure that actors working in areas related to disinformation issues contribute to the integrity of information, such as journalists and fact-checkers.

В этом разделе будут рассмотрены эти категории нормативных вмешательств, касающихся контента, таких субъектов, как платформы, и целей дезинформации, языка вражды, компьютерной пропаганды и других вредоносных форм контента, включая: 

All of these structures have elements that influence the information space, especially with respect to freedom of expression, privacy and internal conflict when creating open spaces for online conversation, and also ensure the inclusion and punishment of hate speech or other problematic content. They are also evolving and adapting to the new challenges of an increasingly online and networked society that faces disinformation, hate speech and other harmful content. This guide will now go into more detail and analysis of these approaches and potential models, as well as partner organizations, sponsors, and organizational arrangements.