United States of America

Twitter Trails

This group is a product of Wellesley College and a grant from the National Science Foundation. It tasks itself with investigating rumors and other claims on Twitter for validity, measuring both the spread of the claim (how many people have read it) and its validity. The site also offers blogs for meta-analysis of the misinformation on Twitter it investigates.

The Fake News Detector

The Fake News Detector allows you to detect and flag Fake News, Click Baits and Extremely Biased news. After flagging a newstory, other people that use the Fake News Detector will be able to see your flagging, will pay more attention to it and may also flag it.

Stanford History Education Group

If young people are not prepared to critically evaluate the information that bombards them online, they are apt to be duped by false claims and misleading arguments. To help teachers address these critical skills, we’ve developed assessments of civic online reasoning—the ability to judge the credibility of digital information about social and political issues.

Snopes

When misinformation obscures the truth and readers don’t know what to trust, Snopes.com’s fact checking and original, investigative reporting lights the way to evidence-based and contextualized analysis. We always document our sources so readers are empowered to do independent research and make up their own minds.

[INACTIVE] Quod

Quod -currently in its beta form- is a project to create an open database of misinformation on the web. It was created to crowdsource the difficult task of identifying and cataloging misinformation published online. You can participate by reporting misinformation you encounter online.
(Copied from website)

Putting Civic Online Reason In Civics Class

The COR curriculum was developed by the Stanford History Education Group as part of MediaWise—a partnership of SHEG, the Poynter Institute, and the Local Media Association. The MediaWise collaboration is supported by Google.org as part of their Google News Initiative.

The goal of MediaWise is to provide educators with tools to help students evaluate online information. It is based on classroom research that shows that students in COR classrooms gain significantly in the knowledge and skills needed to determine the trustworthiness of digital content.

Public Editor

Public Editor is an independent, non-profit (501c3) that provides credibility scores for news articles, journalists, public figures and news sites by guiding volunteers to complete online media literacy tasks identifying argumentative fallacies, psychological biases, inferential mistakes, and other misleading content.

With a transparent & non-partisan process, they’re engaging thoughtful citizens in a massive effort to clean up the news.

Project Look Sharp Media Curriculum

Project Look Sharp is a nonprofit, mission-driven outreach program of Ithaca College. Our mission is to help K-16 educators enhance students’ critical thinking, metacognition, and civic engagement through media literacy materials and professional development.

Founded in 1996, we have evolved from a grass-roots initiative focused on schools in Upstate NY to an internationally acclaimed organization that works with education leaders from around the world.

Pro Truth Pledge

The Pro-Truth Pledge is a project of Intentional Insights, a volunteer-run educational nonpartisan 501(c)(3) nonprofit devoted to promoting science-based truth-seeking, rational thinking, and wise decision-making. It is a pledge for politicians and citizens to promote truthful informatoin in political systems. The Pro-Truth Pledge project is led by the volunteer Board of Directors of Intentional Insights with input and consultation of the Advisory Board.

Frustrated by misinformation and incivility in public discourse?

PolitiFact

Fact-checking journalism is the heart of PolitiFact. The core principles are independence, transparency, fairness, thorough reporting and clear writing. The reason we publish is to give citizens the information they need to govern themselves in a democracy.

Since their launch in 2007, they’ve received many questions about how we choose facts to check, how we stay nonpartisan, how we go about fact-checking and other topics. This document attempts to answer those questions and many more.