Research Tools for Understanding Disinformation

Data Analytics for Social Media Monitoring

This new guide is designed to help democracy practitioners better understand social media trends, content, data, and networks. By sharing lessons learned and best practices from across our global network, we hope to empower our partners to make democracy work online by helping them:

• Collaborate with local, national, or international partners;

• Understand different methods of data collection;

• Make the best use of mapping and data visualization;

• Analyze the online ecosystem; 

• Detect malicious or manipulated content and its source; 

Global Right to Information Rating

The global RTI Rating measures the strength of the legal framework for the right to access information held by public authorities (the right to information or RTI).

(Copied from website)

Youtube DataViewer

The Youtube Dataviewer is a tool that allows users to extract metadata from Youtube videos. It allows users to track information such as original upload time of videos as well as running a reverse image search on all thumbnails used for videos, making it easier to see whether a video is actually relevant to the event people claim. To find the information, just copy and paste the URL into the dataviewer and search.

(Independently written)

WikiWhatsThis

A Browser Extension for Adding Context to Online Stories by Suggesting Related Wikipedia Articles

WikiWhatsThis will be a browser extension that adds context to online stories by allowing readers to highlight arbitrary chunks of text and request related Wikipedia articles. The extension will use text features combined with Wikipedia page quality signals to show the user the bigger picture around what they are reading.

(Copied from website)

Who Targets Me

Who Targets Me are a small group of activists creating and managing a crowdsourced global database of political adverts placed on social media.

We were founded by Sam Jeffers and Louis Knight Webb in 2017 during the UK elections to monitor the use of online political ads in real time and provide analysis of their intended impact. The Who Targets Me plug-in has now been installed by over 30,000 users worldwide in more than 100 countries and 20 languages.

What’s Crap on WhatsApp? (by Africa Check)

As far as we are aware, “What’s Crap on WhatsApp?” is the first show of its kind. We’re going to fight WhatsApp misinformation on WhatsApp in a format designed for WhatsApp.

Fact-checking organisations have traditionally tried to attract readers to websites, video and social media. But we’re taking our show to people on WhatsApp in a format widely used on the platform.

WeVerify

WeVerify’s aim is to address the advanced content verification challenges through a participatory verification approach, open source algorithms, low-overhead human-in-the-loop machine learning and intuitive visualizations. Social media and web content will be analysed for detection of disinformation; contextualised within the broader social web and media ecosystem; and misleading and fabricated content will be exposed as such, both through micro-targeted debunking and a blockchain-based public database of known fakes.

Ushahidi Inc

Ushahidi, which translates to “testimony” in Swahili, was developed to map reports of violence in Kenya after the post-election violence in 2008. Since then, thousands have used our crowdsourcing tools to raise their voice. We’re a technology leader in Africa, headquartered in Nairobi, with a global team. We are a social enterprise that provides software and services to numerous sectors and civil society to help improve the bottom up flow of information.

We believe that if marginalized people are able to easily communicate to those who aim to serve them...

Twitter Trails

This group is a product of Wellesley College and a grant from the National Science Foundation. It tasks itself with investigating rumors and other claims on Twitter for validity, measuring both the spread of the claim (how many people have read it) and its validity. The site also offers blogs for meta-analysis of the misinformation on Twitter it investigates.