Elections

Research and Education

Within the disinformation and memory studies direction, the Institute for Development of Freedom of Information (IDFI) team is developing tools in several ways. Firstly, IDFI research historical roots and disinformation narratives that are weaponized in contemporary times. Secondly, IDFI develops academic courses that are offered to the students in schools of media and social sciences, and to representatives of CSOs and civil servants.

The Social Media Dashboard for the German 2021 Federal Election

A live dashboard analyzing the top German candidate's presence on multiple social media platforms. The website highlights posts published by the candidates themselves and posts made about the candidate by the general public. In-depth analyses will be published as the campaign period continues until October 2021.

Digital Democracy Risk Assessment: A User Guide

A user guide for civil society organizations and researchers to assess the vulnerability of a country’s electoral integrity to online manipulation. It also provides strategies for both parties to assemble reports based on a standard methodology and comparable datasets. 

Assessment of Online Risks for the 2021 German Federal Elections

A report analyzing the online environment and potential risks for the 2021 German Federal Elections. It studies topics ranging from online advertising, hate speech, disinformation and foreign interference. The end of the report provides recommendations for improvements and regulations in each category. 

Name It. Change It. Research and Reports

Name It. Change It releases research projects and studies demonstrating gender-based challenges women face from the media when they run for office. In the past, they have published studies revealing where voters saw the most media sexism during the 2016 elections and conducted surveys on media coverage of women candidates’ appearance. The results of these reports continue to raise awareness about this growing issue and support their guides on best practices for gender-neutral coverage of women candidates. 

Europe and Eurasia Regional Election Management Body Working Group on Social Media, Disinformation and Electoral Integrity

This working group for electoral management bodies was established to tackle challenges presented by social media and disinformation to the electoral process in May 2021. With nearly 50 election officials from 13 countries in the Eastern Partnership and Western Balkans, the group provides EMBs a platform for continued peer learning, skill-building, and developing best practices.  

Dutch Code of Conduct Transparency Online Political Advertisements

This Code of Conduct was published to address the issues of election transparency and disinformation in the digital sphere. This code requires transparency regarding the sender, costs, and reach of advertisements during the election campaign. It also urges political parties to avoid posting misleading messages or accept foreign funding for advertising. 

Nepal “Code of Conduct to be Followed by Mass Media, Non-Governmental Organizations and Observers”

Nepal’s Election Commission published their electoral code of conduct in 2015, which established standards and regulations for various institutions, persons, bodies and authorities. The code includes language for the mass media in preventing the publication, broadcast, or dissemination of “baseless information in favor of or against candidate or political party on electronically used social networks such as S.M.S., Facebook, Twitter and Viber”. Clauses such as these work to ban deliberate sharing of fake news during Nepal’s election period. 

Georgia “Ethical Principles of Candidates of 28 October 2018 Presidential Elections”

The purpose of the “Ethical Principles of Candidates of 28 October 2018 Presidential Elections” was to establish guidelines for presidential candidates during their election campaigns. The Central Election Commission and candidates agreed to broad disinformation guidance through the clauses such as:

  • “abstain from the dissemination of false information with prior knowledge”
  • “refuse to use any hate speech or statements that involved xenophobia or intimidation.” 

Coalizão para Checagem – Eleições 2020 (Fact-Checking Coalition – 2020 Elections)

TSE coordinated a fact-checking coalition, comprising nine renowned fact-checking organizations from the media, named “Coalizão para Checagem – Eleições 2020” (Fact-Checking Coalition – 2020 Elections). The Coalition’s purpose was to verify the factual accuracy of information, news, and stories targeting the electoral process. It encompassed the work of around 100 individuals, including journalists from the fact-checking agencies and officers from the Superior Electoral Court and the 27 state-level EMBs (Regional Electoral Courts).